Picture Gallery
News Headlines

Fri. Jul 25th 2014
NEW TRUCK

Please help The Claysville Fire Dept. Earn a new truck

Read more »

Search Our Site

Search:



Contact Information

Claysville Volunteer Fire Department Inc.
Po. Box 435, 154 Main st.
Claysville Pa. 15323



Non-Emergency:
724-663-4240

Emergency:
911

Contact Us

Birthdays for November

2nd Marc Scott
8th Kyle McAdoo
29th Dominic Sicchitano

Links

Cecil Township VFC #2

Station 29


Charleroi

Station 33


Lock 4 VFC

Station 22



 

  

 Welcome  to Claysville Volunteer

Fire

Department Inc. 

 

Please look around and sign our guest book


 

ANNUAL CHRISTMAS PARADE

SATURDAY 12-6-2014

LINE UP 5:30PM. 

 PARADE 6:00PM.

 

 

 

 


The Facts About Chimney Fires

 

 

 

 

Creosote & Chimney Fires: What You Must Know

Fireplaces and wood stoves are designed to safely contain wood-fuel fires, while providing heat for a home. The chimneys that serve them have the job of expelling the by-products of combustion – the substances produced when wood burns. These include smoke, water vapor, gases, unburned wood particles, hydrocarbon, tar fog and assorted minerals. As these substances exit the fireplace or wood stove, and flow up into the relatively cooler chimney, condensation occurs. The resulting residue that sticks to the inner walls of the chimney is called creosote.  

 

Creosote is black or brown in appearance. It can be crusty and flaky…tar-like, drippy and sticky…or shiny and hardened. Often, all forms will occur in one chimney system. Whatever form it takes, creosote is highly combustible. If it builds up in sufficient quantities – and the internal flue temperature is high enough – the result could be a chimney fire.  Certain conditions encourage the buildup of creosote. Restricted air supply, unseasoned wood and, cooler than normal chimney temperatures are all factors that can accelerate the buildup of creosote on chimney flue walls. Air supply may be restricted by closing the glass doors, by failing to open the damper wide enough, and the lack of sufficient make-up air  to move heated smoke up the chimney rapidly (the longer the smoke’s “residence time” in the flue, the more likely is it that creosote will form). A wood stove’s air supply can be limited by closing down the stove damper or air inlets too soon or too much. Burning unseasoned wood – because so much energy is used initially just to drive off the water trapped in the cells of the logs– keeps the resulting smoke cooler, than if seasoned wood is used. In the case of wood stoves, overloading the firebox with wood in an attempt to get a longer burn time also contributes to creosote buildup.

 

How Chimney Fires Hurt Chimneys 

Masonry Chimneys

When a chimney fire occur in masonry chimney – whether the flue is an older, unlined type or tile lined to meet current safety codes – the high temperatures at which they burn (around 2000°F) can “melt mortar, crack tiles, cause liners to collapse and damage the outer masonry material”.  Most often, thermal shock occurs and tiles crack and mortar is displaced, which provides a pathway for flames to reach the combustible wood frame of the house. This event is extremely dangerous, call 911 immediately.

 

Pre-fabricated, factory-built, metal chimneys

To be installed in most jurisdictions in the United States, factory built, metal chimneys that are designed to vent wood burning stoves or pre-fabricated metal fireplaces must pass special tests. Most tests require the chimney to withstand flue temperatures up to 2100°F – without sustaining damage. Under chimney fire conditions, damage to these systems still may occur. When pre-fabricated, factory-built metal chimneys are damaged by a chimney fire, they should no longer be used and must be replaced.  

 

Special Effects on Wood Stoves

Wood stoves are made to contain hot fires. The connector pipes that run from the stove to the chimney are another matter. They cannot withstand the high temperatures produced during a chimney fire and can warp, buckle and even separate from the vibrations created by air turbulence during a fire. If damaged by a chimney fire, they must be replaced.  

 

Nine Signs that You’ve Had a Chimney Fire
Since a chimney, damaged by a chimney fire, can endanger a home and its’ occupants and a chimney fire can occur without anyone being aware of them it’s important to have your chimney regularly inspected by a CSIA Certifed Chimney Sweep. Here are the signs that a professional chimney sweep looks for:

  • “Puffy” or “honey combed” creosote
  • Warped metal of the damper, metal smoke chamber connector pipe or factory-built metal chimney
  • Cracked or collapsed flue tiles, or tiles with large chunks missing
  • Discolored and/or distorted rain cap
  • Heat-damaged TV antenna attached to the chimney
  • Creosote flakes and pieces found on the roof or ground
  • Roofing material damaged from hot creosote
  • Cracks in exterior masonry
  • Evidence of smoke escaping through mortar joints of masonry or tile liners

 

If you think a chimney fire has occurred, call a CSIA Certified Chimney Sweep® for a professional evaluation. If your suspicions are confirmed, a certified sweep will be able to make recommendations about how to bring the system back into compliance with safety standards. Depending on the situation, you might need a few flue tiles replaced, a new liner system installed or an entire chimney rebuilt. Each situation is unique and will dictate its own solution.  

 

Proper Maintenance

Clean chimneys don’t catch fire. Make sure a CSIA Certified Chimney Sweep inspects your solid fuel venting system annually, and cleans and repairs it whenever needed. Your sweep may have other maintenance recommendations depending on how you use your fireplace or stove. CSIA recommends that you call on CSIA Certified Chimney Sweeps, since they are regularly tested on their understanding of the complexities of chimney and venting system.   

 

- See more at: http://www.csia.org/homeowner-resources/the_facts_about_chimney_fires.aspx#sthash.Fdr1qkde.dpuf

 

“Chimneys really decorate the roofline of a home… and they’re maintenance–free, besides. Right?”  Your chimney–and the flue that lines it–adds architectural interest to your home, but its’ real function is to carry dangerous flue gases from your fireplace, wood stove or furnace safely out of your home. A chimney helps your household air stay breathable…just as your windows and your bathroom, attic and kitchen vents do. Unlike those other exhaust points in your home, however, fireplace and wood stove chimneys need a special kind of care.

As you snuggle in front of a cozy fire or bask in the warmth of your wood stove, you are taking part in a ritual of comfort and enjoyment handed down through the centuries. The last thing you are likely to be thinking about is the condition of your chimney. However, if you don’t give some thought to it before you light those winter fires, your enjoyment may be very short-lived. Why? Dirty chimneys can cause chimney fires, which damage structures, destroy homes and injure or kill people. 

 

No One Welcomes a Chimney Fire

A chimney fire in action can be impressive. Indications of a chimney fire have been described as creating:

  • loud cracking and popping noise
  • a lot of dense smoke, and
  • an intense, hot smell

Chimney fires can burn explosively – noisy and dramatic enough to be detected by neighbors or people passing by. Flames or dense smoke may shoot from the top of the chimney. Homeowners report being startled by a low rumbling sound that reminds them of a freight train or a low flying airplane. However, those are only the chimney fires you know about. Slow-burning chimney fires don’t get enough air or have fuel to be dramatic or visible. But, the temperatures they reach are very high and can cause as much damage to the chimney structure – and nearby combustible parts of the house – as their more spectacular cousins. With proper chimney system care, chimney fires are entirely preventable. 

 






Recent Calls

Sat. Apr 12th 2014
Structure fire Buffalo TWP.

Station 31 was dispatched at 14:00 hours for a reported structure fire.  Captain 31 was first on scene confirming a work...

Read more »


Wed. Apr 2nd 2014
Structure fire Donegal TWP.

Station 31 was dispatched to a vehicle on fire inside a garage at approx. 21:42 hours.  Upon arrival of Engine 31 c...

Read more »


Sun. Mar 2nd 2014
Accident with entrapment Blaine Twp.

Crews from Station 31 and Taylorstown (36) were dispatched to a reported two vehicle accident. Upon arrival crews found a hea...

Read more »

Upcoming Events

7:00pm
Every 3rd Monday
Training


7:00pm
Every 4th Monday
Training


7:00pm
Every 2nd Monday
Meeting

Apparatus Gallery
2014 Call Volume
  Fire
Jan 62
Feb 59
Mar 63
Apr 70
May 54
Jun 59
Jul 70
Aug 62
Sep 59
Oct 48
Nov  
Dec  
Total 606

View Call Volume History


YourFirstDue.com Managed web hosting for Fire/EMS

Advertisements







Login



Copyright © 2006-2014. YourFirstDue Inc.. All Rights Reserved. Designated trademarks and brands are the property of their respective owners. Content on this web site is supplied by Claysville Volunteer Fire Department Inc.. YourFirstDue Inc. cannot be held responsible or liable for any content, text, pictures, or any other media found on this web site. Maintained by the members and staff of Claysville Volunteer Fire Department Inc..

This site has been
viewed 195,731 times.